Mobility & Seasonally Good Weather

A Tiny House that’s truly mobile

Since we first started looking for a home in Florida I have been attracted to this sort of idea. We saw the pole barn frame for this idea in Port St. Joe, Florida probably four years ago. It was bigger than what’s shown in this photo and was probably for a fifth wheel trailer.

Here’s what I like: The main ingredient is mobility. I can see us moving up to Maine during the summer and fall and then back to Florida from November through May. We can stop where we want both coming and going. I can envision a setup either in Florida only, or at both ends of the migration. In both places we would leave behind outdoor furniture, a grill, some landscaping tools, and such. Add a modest sized shed for storage to the plan in both places.

This would certainly be modest living, but it might be fun and affordable.

At Home with a Blue Roof

Hurricane Michael got us. We were hit pretty hard. My wife and I evacuated a day before the storm with our truck and camping trailer, so we were safe.

While the photos show the effect of the hurricane on our home we are grateful that the damage wasn’t worse. We do indeed have tarps on the roof at the moment, just like most of our neighbors. Almost no one was spared damage in our little town on the Florida Panhandle.

The scene throughout the area is shocking. Hundreds of thousands of trees are broken, tilting over, uprooted, or just snapped in half. Trucks to haul away the debris, heavy equipment for loading, and the sounds of chainsaws, demolition crews, roofers, and sirens have filled the air here since October 10th when the hurricane came through. It’s much calmer now, but a lot remains to be done. Reconstruction is only beginning now. We ourselves hope to start soon at our place.

We think that we are doing fine, but it’s interesting how our minds and emotions work. There are up days mostly, but we both have emotional crashes, and then there are the days where the emotional exhaustion takes over and we have to veg for a day.

The positives are there. We’re insured. We didn’t get hurt. We still have a home and we can live in it. Uncertainty and a sensation of not being in control grip us though. It’s a new sensation. Also, what about next year?

 

 

Fountain Pens

pexels-photo-261450Not too long ago I wrote an article about fountain pens on Medium. It got a little bit of interest and so I thought that I’d put a link here.

Here is the link.

Blog Post – Local Business

cropped-img_0680.jpgWhile anyone can publish online to a website, a small business, with a customer base that’s local, and that’s often not looking for that businesses story details activity; this sort of business would be wasting time and money with only an online presence.

So then, how do we reach the customers?

  1. Press releases through the local newspaper. Have an event and promote the event, but include a large dollop of background about the business, the people who work there, perhaps the unique location and the historical significance of the building. Any information and background that will catch the readers eye, giving them a greater appreciation for the business itself. Don’t forget to include the values and reasons for the existence of your business; anything that matters, and that will help to create a bond with the customers. A press release costs only some time to create. If published, it may reach a significant percentage of your community, your customer base.
  2. Sales Flyers. Go ahead and promote the products and services that you wish to present to the community, but reserve a half page to say something about your values, what your business aspires to provide or solve for the greater good, that sort of thing. Only speak the truth. What drives you? Where is your passion, your reason for being? Give the customer a strong sense of who you are, and why they ought to do business with you.
  3. Window Display. Why not? If you have a window, clean it, and post a welcome sign with a paragraph or two about the business and its people.
  4. Business Cards that direct attention to a website with information that matters to your customers. This could be technical information. Maps or directions. PDF files that help the customer to use your products. Details about government regulations perhaps. Include your story on the website, include a PDF with a long version of the story if there is one. Include pictures – lots of them if possible.

The Elevator Pitch

HandshakeGet ready to explain who you are, and what you do. You will use this planned information over-and-over.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/perfect-pitch-how-to-nail-your-elevator-speech

What Is Business Storytelling?

Notice the four ways a story teller might tell their story, and why only the last should be used. Also, please play attention to telling just one aspect of the story at any one time, and why that’s important.

A Good Video About Corporate Storytelling

Maybe this will help with visualization of storytelling for your company.

Passionate Efforts need a Narrative and Certainly Images

7CB13A2C-D229-475B-9FFB-CAF97C2C06C1Passionate commitment to your values and relentless attention to details can have its rewards. But tell the story!  Being great doesn’t matter if you are unknown to those that care.

Customer Service – Bad Experiences

customer-service-1714287_1920My wife and I are currently doing some remodeling. We recently had a series of bad experiences at one of the big box retailers. Ultimately, to resolve our problems with the retailer we traveled between three of their stores. I don’t want to waste my readers time on a rant about the experience, but what we noticed is that the service experience was bad in all three locations. There is something to learn from that.

  1. Most of the problems had to do with the bad information. Items that were supposedly in inventory simply were not there. Bad inventory records. It’s the end of the year and I’ll bet they take inventory just now and may correct the records shortly. Nevertheless, it was the prime issue.
  2. The customer service people involved were not really helpful. I’d say they were overworked, but we also noticed that many of the customer service personnel were talking with each other, wandering about, and just seemed underused and perhaps trying to find information. It makes me wonder about the record keeping and the software being used.
  3. The items we needed were not available in one location in sufficient quantity to complete our project. The project is not overly large. The items were simply not stocked in sufficient quantities for an average project.

customer-1253483_960_720What does all this matter?

  1. As an opportunity, these big box retailers are dropping the ball and giving others an opportunity to satisfy the customer demand. The demand is for the products needed, and it is in sufficient quantities to complete the work. Also, there is demand for reasonably good communications and customer service. It’s just too hard to do business with a group of persons who are not engaged and haven’t the tools, or the will to help.
  2. Almost everyone has experienced this sort of treatment in one of these big box stores. Service and support are non-existent. Can your business capitalize on this? Maybe you don’t have the size to compete on all fronts with these guys, but perhaps you are simply better at one or more things. Isn’t that what you want to tell the customer base?

Beat them on your terms and tell the world about it.

Tell More, Sell More: The Art of Storytelling

Storytelling in Business is a big part of what I am interested in sharing with the readers. This is a re-post of a very good article about just that written by Eric Gordon and can be found on www.business2community.com.

Tell More, Sell More: The Art of Storytelling